Tuesday, February 2, 2010

    Adam Gordon's Raindrops - Blending Modern with Modern

    Ambient, orchestral, neoclassic. Every now and then I step away from the grunge to partake in something lighter. But make no mistake; I'm still the middle-aged headbanger that has been spinning rock on a turntable since the early 1970s. Some things never die.

    Adam Gordon's Raindrops is thoroughly modern in a 20th Century sense. So in a way it's blending 20th Century with the 21st Century. I like the way some of the tracks build up and entertain. When this album was submitted for review, the musician advised that the listener mustn't be in a hurry. Very true. While my tastes typically steer towards an hard electric guitar and a pounding drum beat, I do like to slow down from time to time. This ambient stuff can really grow on you after a while. Here's what I discovered about each track:

    1. Raindrops - Classic smooth jazz track.

    2. Blue Hill - This one reminds me at first of Chet Baker's tracks that were in the movie "L.A. Confidential." but then it switches into a surprise blend of sounds not expected at the beginning.

    3. Remember (Interlude) - Haunting, sparse, builds on that theme with horns.'s over!

    4. Memories - Reminds me of snow falling, only a really fast hard snow. The keyboards have a 1980s feeling to them. Again, the buildup from a sparse beginning to a middle that creates a tapestry of sound and variety.

    5. Rainbow - My least-favorite track. Didn't build fast enough to keep me interested. Good musicianship though.

    6. Raindrops (Reprise) - I hear sadness, and of course the theme building that is common in all the tracks (except for Rainbow). It works well as a bookend song tied to the first track.

    As I've written this, each track has played at least three times. The entire collection is mellow enough that it doesn't really get old. Listen to the album for yourself in the embedded player below. If you don't see it, click HERE to listen to it directly on Jamendo.

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